Khiva (Uzbek, Xiva, Persian خیوه – Xiveh) is a city in the Khorezm region of Uzbekistan.

Surrounded by powerful walls, the historical inner city of Khiva, the pearl of the Khorezm oasis, is declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The legend of the foundation of the city tells that the city grew around the well of Havak, the water of which had amazing taste, and the well was dug out by the order of Sim, the son of the biblical Noah. In Ichan-Kala (the inner city of Khiva) and today you can see this well. Khiva was one of the cities of ancient Khorezm, which was a large state located in the west of Central Asia, south of the Aral Sea.

According to archaeological data, Khiva was founded more than 2500 years ago. In ancient times, the city was known as Havak. According to legend, Khiva was founded by one of the prophets. In its history, the city survived the Achaemenid conquest and periods of prosperity, when the borders of ancient Khorezm stretched to Colchis.

Khiva was not originally the capital of Khorezm. Historians say that in 1598, the Amudarya (a large river, whose sources are in the Pamirs, at an altitude of 2,495 m) retreated from the former capital of Urgench (formerly Gurganj). The Amu Darya, flowing through the territory of the Khanate, flowed into the Caspian Sea along the old riverbed, known as the Uzba, supplying the inhabitants with water, and also providing a waterway to Europe. For centuries, the river has radically changed its course several times. The last turn of the Amu Darya in the end of the XVI century was destroyed by Gurganj. At a distance of 150 km from modern Khiva, near the village of Kunya-Urgench (the territory of Turkmenistan), which means “old Urgench”, are the ruins of the ancient capital.

From 305 to 995 Khorezm, which included Khiva, was ruled by the dynasty of the Afrigids.

In 712 Khiva was captured by the Arabs of Qutiba ibn-Muslim. After that, Khiva became part of the Muslim world. Despite the dependence on the Arabs, Afrigidae preserved power at the end of the tenth century.

History

Khiva (Uzbek, Xiva, Persian خیوه – Xiveh) is a city in the Khorezm region of Uzbekistan.

Surrounded by powerful walls, the historical inner city of Khiva, the pearl of the Khorezm oasis, is declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The legend of the foundation of the city tells that the city grew around the well of Havak, the water of which had amazing taste, and the well was dug out by the order of Sim, the son of the biblical Noah. In Ichan-Kala (the inner city of Khiva) and today you can see this well. Khiva was one of the cities of ancient Khorezm, which was a large state located in the west of Central Asia, south of the Aral Sea.

According to archaeological data, Khiva was founded more than 2500 years ago. In ancient times, the city was known as Havak. According to legend, Khiva was founded by one of the prophets. In its history, the city survived the Achaemenid conquest and periods of prosperity, when the borders of ancient Khorezm stretched to Colchis.

Khiva was not originally the capital of Khorezm. Historians say that in 1598, the Amudarya (a large river, whose sources are in the Pamirs, at an altitude of 2,495 m) retreated from the former capital of Urgench (formerly Gurganj). The Amu Darya, flowing through the territory of the Khanate, flowed into the Caspian Sea along the old riverbed, known as the Uzba, supplying the inhabitants with water, and also providing a waterway to Europe. For centuries, the river has radically changed its course several times. The last turn of the Amu Darya in the end of the XVI century was destroyed by Gurganj. At a distance of 150 km from modern Khiva, near the village of Kunya-Urgench (the territory of Turkmenistan), which means “old Urgench”, are the ruins of the ancient capital.

From 305 to 995 Khorezm, which included Khiva, was ruled by the dynasty of the Afrigids.

In 712 Khiva was captured by the Arabs of Qutiba ibn-Muslim. After that, Khiva became part of the Muslim world. Despite the dependence on the Arabs, Afrigidae preserved power at the end of the tenth century.

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